How to Access Your Wi-Fi Router's Settings

Determine router address

How to access a home network router setup or console
Assign your router a new username and password. If none of the combinations work and your router is not brand new then someone may have previously accessed the router configuration and changed the default password to something else — if they cannot tell you the new password then you may have no choice but to reset the router back to default factory settings and the default username and password i. Answer this question Flag as The Best PC Games. Not Helpful 2 Helpful 1.

How do I configure my model of router?

Can't access my router's configuration page thru explorer

If your particular model is not shown then try the username and password for a different model by the same manufacturer. Manufacturers often use the same username and password for most of their routers aimed at home users e. D-Link typically use admin and admin, Netgear typically use admin and password.

If none of the combinations work and your router is not brand new then someone may have previously accessed the router configuration and changed the default password to something else — if they cannot tell you the new password then you may have no choice but to reset the router back to default factory settings and the default username and password i.

How To Reset the Router to Factory Settings — By resetting your router back to factory settings you will permanently lose the current configuration and will have to set up the router again before you can access the internet or connect via wireless. Most routers can be reset to factory settings as follows:. Once the router is reset you now need to set up the router before you can access the internet again or connect via wireless. Here you can set a new password to prevent other people from changing your custom settings.

Feel free to click around and see the features your router offers. You could consider enabling parental controls , setting time limits to restrict Internet usage during certain hours, setting a custom DNS server, and performing a variety of other tweaks.

Bear in mind that not every router will have every feature, and different routers have different layouts, so a setting may appear elsewhere in the interface. For example, you should be able to see the list of computers and devices connected to your Wi-Fi network from here. Just looks for a Status page — this information may be on a general Status page, or a Wi-Fi Status page.

Andy Melton on Flickr. In that case, you may simply want to reset your router so all settings revert back to their defaults. You'll usually find a small Reset button on your router. Use a pointed object such as a pen or paper clip to push in and hold the Reset button for around 10 seconds. Then release the button. You should now be able to log into your router using the default username and password. Your first task will be to change the wireless network name, wireless network password, and security level.

You should also go through each screen to see if there are other settings you wish to change. Documentation and built-in help should be available to assist you with these screens if you're not sure how to set them. Most current or recent routers also have setup wizards that can take care of some of this labor for you. The process for logging into your router should be the same whether you use your Internet provider's router or you purchased your own router. Finally, you can and should change your router's username and password from their default values.

This better secures your router so only you can access the firmware screens. Just remember the new credentials to avoid having to reset the router to make any changes in the future. And be sure to test your own Internet speed.

Do You Still Send Faxes? Surviving a long and varied career in publishing, advertising, and IT, Lance Whitney now wears a few different technology hats. By day, he's a journalist, software trainer, and sometime Web developer. By night, he's asleep. These days, he writes news stories, columns, and reviews for CNET and other technology sites and publications. This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

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