The Best VPN Services of 2018

VPNs Keep You Safe Online

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Support Center Submit Ticket Knowledgebase. And while IP addresses may change, it's possible to track someone across the internet by watching where the same IP address appears. I was experiencing many issues trying to …. Supported Applications Overview of support policy and list of supported applications Applications List and Search Full list of available applications with search feature. This approach delivers a rock solid VPN which supports any IPsec compliant firewall or router, as well as end user devices including desktops, laptops, iPads, iPhones, and Android smart phones. VPNs that work with Netflix today may not work tomorrow.

What Is a VPN?


Alerts will be sent to eApps Support for resolution. This approach delivers a rock solid VPN which supports any IPsec compliant firewall or router, as well as end user devices including desktops, laptops, iPads, iPhones, and Android smart phones. Our customers use our VPN solution to encrypt traffic between servers and IPsec compliant devices as well providing secure access to servers for an authenticated user base. The platform has an excellent administration interface for configuration, or have eApps setup your VPN for a reasonable fee.

Our most popular mode is commonly used to create a persistent tunnel between your eApps server and a remote firewall. The VPN is flexible, and can connect to one or more end points, internal or external to the eApps network.

This configuration is used to secure a private application service for a group of users. Your VPN service will be up and running in minutes! Our Sales department is here to answer any questions you have about the Virtual Private Network services and assist you in getting started. Click on the Chat NOW icon to the right for assistance. Kudos to Bladimir, for providing superior customer service I just want to share my appreciation for Bladimir Fernandez, a technical support person on the eApps team.

I was experiencing many issues trying to …. Thanks for making it so easy! The thing about virtual servers is that they can be configured to appear as if they are in one country when they are actually being hosted somewhere else.

That's an issue if you're especially concerned about where you web traffic is traveling. It's a bit worrisome to choose one location and discover you're actually connected somewhere else entirely. We have often said that having to choose between security and convenience is a false dichotomy, but it is at least somewhat true in the case of VPN services.

When a VPN is active, your web traffic is taking a more circuitous route than usual, often resulting in sluggish download and upload speeds as well as increased latency. The good news is that using a VPN probably isn't going to remind you of the dial-up days of yore.

Most services provide perfectly adequate internet speed when in use, and can even handle streaming HD video. However, 4K video and other data-intensive tasks like gaming over a VPN are another story. And nearly every service we have tested includes a tool to connect you with the fastest available network.

Of course, you can always limit your VPN use to when you're not on a trusted network. When we test VPNs, we use the Ookla speed test tool. This test provides metrics for latency, download speeds, and upload speeds. Any one of these can be an important measurement depending on your needs, but we tend to view the download speed as the most important.

After all, we live in an age of digital consumption. Our speed tests stress comparison and reproducibility. That means we stand by our work, but your individual results may vary. After all, perhaps you live on top of a VPN server, or just happen to have a super-high bandwidth connection. It doesn't take the top spot in all of our tests, but has remarkably low latency and had the best performance in the all-important download tests.

Fittingly, it offers many add-ons such as dedicated IP addresses that, along with its speed, will appeal to the BitTorrent users it is designed to protect. Borders still exist on the web, in the form of geographic restrictions for streaming content. The rest of the world, not so much. But if you were to select a VPN server in the UK, your computer's IP address would appear to be the same as the server, allowing you to view the content.

The trouble is that Netflix and similar video streaming services are getting wise to the scam. In our testing, we found that Netflix blocks streaming more often than not when we were using a VPN. There are a few exceptions, but Netflix is actively working to protect its content deals. VPNs that work with Netflix today may not work tomorrow. Netflix blocking paying customers might seem odd, but it's all about regions and not people.

Just because you paid for Netflix in one place does not mean you're entitled to the content available on the same service but in a different location. Media distribution and rights are messy and complicated. You may or may not agree with the laws and terms of service surrounding media streaming, but you should definitely be aware that they exist and understand when you're taking the risk of breaking them.

Netflix, for its part, lays out how that it will attempt to verify a user's location in order to provide content in section 6c of its Terms of Use document. If you don't know what Kodi is, you're not alone. However, an analysis of searches leading to our site reveals that a surprising number of you are, in fact looking for VPN that works with the mysterious Kodi. With Kodi, you can access your media over a local connection LAN or from a remote media server, if that's your thing.

This is, presumably, where concerns about VPN enter the picture. A device using a VPN, for example, will have its connection encrypted on the local network. You might have trouble connecting to it. Using Chromecast on a VPN device just doesn't work, for example. Kodi users might have the same issue.

For local VPN issues, you have a couple of options. Alternatively, many VPN services offer browser plug-ins that only encrypt your browser traffic. That's not ideal from a security perspective, but it's useful when all you need to secure is your browser information.

Some, but not all, VPN services will let you designate specific applications to be routed outside the encrypted tunnel. This means the traffic will be unencrypted, but also accessible locally. If you're trying to connect to a remote media source with Kodi, a VPN would likely play a different role. It might, for example, prevent your ISP from determining what you're up to.

It might also be useful if you're connecting to a third-party service for Kodi that allows streaming of copyright-infringing material. Keep in mind, however, that some VPN services specifically forbid the use of their services for copyright infringement. When we test VPNs, we generally start with the Windows client. This is often the most complete review, covering several different platforms as well as the service's features and pricing in depth. That's purely out of necessity, since most of our readers use Windows although this writer is currently using a MacBook Air.

We periodically upgrade to a newer machine, in order to simulate what most users experience. But as you can see from the chart at the top, however, Windows is not the only platform for VPNs.

The Android mobile operating system, for example, is the most widely used OS on the planet. So it makes sense that we also test VPNs for Android. That's not to ignore Apple users.

While Google has worked to make it easier to use a VPN with a Chromebook or Chromebox, it's not always a walk in the park. Our guide to how to set up a VPN on a Chromebook can make the task a bit easier, however. In these cases, you might find it easier to install a VPN plug-in for the Chrome browser. This will only secure some of your traffic, but it's better than nothing.

Finally, we have lately begun to review the best Linux VPN apps , too. We used to advise people to do banking and other important business over their cellular connection when using a mobile device, since it is generally safer than connecting with a public Wi-Fi network. But even that isn't always a safe bet. Researchers have demonstrated how a portable cell tower, such as a femtocell , can be used for malicious ends.

The attack hinges on jamming the LTE and 3G bands, which are secured with strong encryption, and forcing devices to connect with a phony tower over the less-secure 2G band. Because the attacker controls the fake tower, he can carry out a man-in-the-middle attack and see all the data passing over the cellular connection. Admittedly, this is an exotic attack, but it's far from impossible. Wi-Fi attacks, on the other hand, are probably far more common than we'd like to believe. While attending the Black Hat convention, researchers saw thousands of devices connecting to a rogue access point.

It had been configured to mimic networks that victim's devices had previously connected to, since many devices will automatically reconnect to a known network without checking with the user. That's why we recommend getting a VPN app for your mobile device to protect all your mobile communications. Even if you don't have it on all the time, using a mobile VPN is a smart way to protect your personal information.

VPN providers typically allow up to five devices to be connected simultaneously under a single account. Also, while there are free VPN services available, many require that mobile users sign up for a paid subscription. Not all mobile VPN apps are created equal. In fact, most VPN providers offer different services and sometimes, different servers for their mobile offerings than they do for their desktop counterparts.

One feature of note for Android users is that some VPN services also block online ads and trackers. While iPhone owners can use apps like 1Blocker to remove ads and trackers from Safari, ad blockers aren't available on the Google Play store. If you're of the iPhone persuasion, there are a few other caveats to consider for a mobile VPN. Thankfully, there's a workaround for this problem. Open it, and you can enter your subscription information from the VPN company you've decided to work with.

Computer and software providers work hard to make sure that the devices you buy are safe right out of the box. But they don't provide everything you'll need. Antivirus software, for example, consistently outperforms the built-in protections. In the same vein, VPN software lets you use the web and Wi-Fi with confidence that your information will remain secure.

It's critically important and often overlooked. Even if you don't use it every moment of every day, a VPN is a fundamental tool that everyone should have at their disposal—like a password manager or an online backup service. A VPN is also a service that will only become more important as our more of our devices become connected.

So stay safe, and get a VPN. Click through the review links of the best VPN services below for detailed analysis and performance results, and feel free to chime in on the comments section below them. Once you've picked, be sure to read our feature on how to set up and use a VPN to get the most from your chosen service. More than 4, servers in diverse locations worldwide. Blocks ads, other web threats. Strong customer privacy stance.

Earning a rare 5-star rating, it's our top pick for VPNs. Browser extensions, including a stand-alone ad blocker. Uninspiring speed test results. Lack of geographic diversity in server locations. It's friendly when you need it to be, invisible when you don't, and it doesn't skimp on security. Far above average number of available servers. Supports P2P file sharing and BitTorrent. Strong stance on customer privacy. Spartan interface may confuse new users.

Excellent and unique features. Offers seven licenses with a subscription. Automatic IP address cycling. Designed for BitTorrent and P2P. Numerous servers spread across the globe. Top speed test scores. It's packed with features sure to appeal to security wonks, and it has the best speed test scores yet, though its client is clunky.

Add-on features like Firewall and dedicated IP. Allows P2P and BitTorrent. Tedious to get online. Unclear where virtual servers are located. Some features didn't work in testing. Restrictive policy on number of devices. Small number of servers. Good geographic distribution of VPN servers. It allows few simultaneous VPN connections, however, and its total number of servers is low.

Hundreds of server locations spread across almost every nation. Relies heavily on virtual server locations. Max Eddy is a Software Analyst, taking a critical eye to Android apps and security services.

He's also PCMag's foremost authority on weather stations and digital scrapbooking software. When not polishing his tinfoil hat or plumbing the depths of the Dark Web, he can be found working to discern the Best Android Apps. Prior to PCMag, Max wrote This newsletter may contain advertising, deals, or affiliate links. Subscribing to a newsletter indicates your consent to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. You may unsubscribe from the newsletters at any time.

Max Eddy Software Analyst. Get Our Best Stories! Fastest Mobile Networks How to Clone a Hard Drive. The Best Laptops of

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